Category Archives: Mini-Hairscapaders

Mini-Hairscapader: Savannah’s HairStory

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Yeah!!!!!  We’re back with the hairstory of another cutie patootie!! Check out the details at the end of the post for how you can submit the hairstory of YOUR very own mini-Hairscapader!!

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image-2as told by Enjoli (mom)

What’s your child’s name and age? Tell us a little about her.
My daughter’s name is Savannah and she just turned two September 13th. She is a fun-loving, energetic baby and absolutely loves to sing and dance. Her favorite fruit is a banana. Probably because I call her Savannah Banana :-). She’s in love with Elmo and thinks ABC’s and numbers ROCK!!!

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How do you care for her hair? What products do you use, how often do you wash/condition, what techniques do you use (i.e., how do you detangle), etc.?
I wash Savannah’s hair every week, usually on Saturdays. She just finished swim classes and they were on Saturday, so that is our usual washing day. I generally wash it while she is in the bathtub at the end of a bath. I use the Shea Moisture Curl Defining Shampoo on her hair and the Restorative Conditioner as a leave in. I detangle it on days that I wash it especially. Once the washing is done, I go through and moisturize her scalp with pure coconut oil. I also put some of the oil on her hair. I usually braid it up and allow it to air dry. She generally wears braids or plaits to bed, so that her hair not all over the place in the am. I detangle her hair with the conditioner on it.

Products that we currently use (even though I am always looking):
Shea Moisture Curl Defining Shampoo
Shea Moisture Curling Souffle
Shea Moisture Curling Milk
Shea Moisture Restorative Conditioner
The Shea Moisture Deep Penetrating Shampoo (If hair is really dirty)
Cantu Shea Butter Leave in conditioning cream

This past weekend, I used a bootleg version of Miss Jessie’s called Curl La La at my BFF’s and loved it. Her hair was soft, smelled great, and the curls lasted all day. So I am looking for that where I live now.

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Do the same products that work for you work for Savannah’s hair?
For the most part. We both have curly hair, although her hair is softer than mine. Her dad has curly hair and his dad before him as well.

What is a typical style? Do you employ protective styles? If so, how often?
It depends on time and her cooperation. LOL! I am learning to cornrow. I can get something in her head and it will be cute, but with her having the texture of hair that she does, it doesn’t usually last too long. If I’m in a rush, we generally settle for the high curly ponytail on top. Its a bit of a cop-out, but when we are pressed for time, it always comes through. LOL! Most recently I did a style that involved beads and she was ecstatic. Had been nervous because I felt like she was too young. If her hair has been twisted up, braided up, or in ponytails for a few days, then I will let her wear it loose in a little curly fro thingy for a few days as well to balance out the tension from the other style.

What challenges do you face with Savannah’s hair?
I just have no idea if I am doing it right! Her hair is so soft, in order to get it to do any styles, it usually involves some type of anchor or holder/rubber band. I try not to use them often. Her hair around her temple is a little thin and, at first, I thought it was falling out. Then I realized as a baby and younger infant, she had no hair there. So, I’ve since calmed down and realized that it is just her hair growing in. It’s different lengths in different areas and I’m not sure what to do about that.

I also get frustrated because, due to the softness of her hair, styles don’t last. If she does get braids, I may get 2 days out of them tops. Twists have to be done daily, banding doesn’t work, and the Bantu knot out didn’t work. I did include pics for you to see what I tried.

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Have you ever relaxed/texlaxed Savannah’s hair? Why or why not and, if you relaxed her hair, what prompted the decision to return to natural?
I will NEVER relax my daughter’s hair. If she gets a relaxer, it will be her decision and her choice and her job to keep it up. LOL!

How does Savannah feel about her natural hair?
She’s only 2. So who knows. I know that she likes it when I do something fancy with it. She stands in the mirror and says, “Ooooh Mommy. Nice!” She enjoys playing in it and pulling on her ponytails. Her hair has quite a bit of length on it, so I think that is more important than texture right now. Just being able to reach it to play with it. She enjoys playing in mine, which is nowhere near the same texture as hers. So I’m guessing she likes it.

Anything else that you’d like to add?
While I will never relax Savannah’s hair, I would never be one to judge anyone who does. We all make the decisions we think are best for our kids at the time. I just hope that no matter what our babies’ hair looks like, we are encouraging them and telling them how beautiful they are. My mother relaxed my hair when I was 6 and I didn’t really need it. It was just easier for her since my hair was so thick. I’ve gone back and forth my entire adult life and am currently sans the creamy crack. I have no problem with relaxers, but have just chosen not to dabble in them anymore for myself. It has not been easy; it has been hard with my own hair. But, in choosing to embrace my hair … embrace me … it is making it easier for me to do hers and it makes her feel good about her hair as it is.

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Can’t. Take. All. the. CUTENESS!!!! LOL!! Just adorable!!

Okay, okay. *Wooosah* My ovaries have calmed down.  Soooooo, do you have a mini-Hairscapader in your house? Wanna share his/her story?! Well then, get on it!! Answer the Mini-Hairscapader HairStory Questions here and e-mail your responses, along with 5-6 (or, you know, 10) pics, to me at hairscapades@gmail.com!! Hope to get your sweetie pie’s story soon!!

(p.s. To see more of these mini hairstories, check out the Mini-Hairscapader category under the HairStory tab!) 

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Margret’s Mane: A Book Review

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by Michelle

A co-worker of mine shared a book with me that her friend’s niece, Aprill Hogue, wrote and illustrated.

via Lulu.com

Margret’s Mane

“This is the tale of a curly-haired girl named Margret, who did not fit in her own little world … Poor Margret hated her hair, and she thought that her world was quite unfair. Why must she be so different from everyone else, with hair so strange–she doubted herself. Join Margret as she soon learns to see, that she is unique, and quite special indeed.”

It’s independently published and I ordered it from the website. Shipping was quick and I ordered it in Chloe’s name. When it arrived in the mail, I told Chloe she had a package. She said, “From who Mama?” I told her I didn’t know. When she opened it, saw a brown girl with wild hair and read the title, “Margret’s Mane,”she exclaimed, “Ms. Shelli sent this to me!” I just laughed and said ok.

A little background as to why this book is special to me and my child. Chloe was born with a head full of almost black hair and it just grew and grew and curled and curled.

Her hair always drew attention from others, especially when she wore it out. People would stop me to want to touch her hair (hell no). They wanted to know what I used on her hair, was she mixed and on and on!

It wasn’t until Chloe started public school that she began to pay attention to the differences in all of the kids. Three years ago, we moved to a diverse community and she has friends from all ethnicities. One of her closest friends is Emily, who has straight blonde hair with a bang. One day, Chloe came home asking for a bang … what? Cutting a female’s hair in the AA community is like a bridge from little girl to big girl – like middle school! Shoot, I was in the 9th grade before I got my first style with a cut! Her dad wasn’t cool with the idea. He wanted his little girl to stay a little girl as long as possible. Even though I wasn’t comfortable with it, I did accept and had to explain to him that other ethnic groups cut their little girls’ hair early (little bobs and bangs) and Chloe was just asking for what seems to be the norm to her. Even with this acceptance … she wasn’t getting a bang *lol*.

I talked to her during one of our hair sessions and I explained to her that God gave her curly hair and her curly hair did not want to be made to do the same thing day in and day out. If she got a bang, it would end up being a big bushy mustache on her forehead and wouldn’t look like Emily’s bang, because she had curly hair that wanted to curl, not be straight. She thought about it and then bust out laughing and said, “Ok Mama … A mustache … bwahaaa!”

Chloe first read Margret’s Mane at her after-care program with one of her teachers who is white and likes to “fix” Chloe’s hair in the evening. Oh, and Chloe brushes and styles her hair as well … lol. She was so excited, she said, “Mama, Margret has wild hair just like mine and it makes her unique like me!”

Chloe’s favorite page.

She went on to tell me all about the book and how her friends were nicer than Margret’s friends because her friends never teased her. The kids in her classroom (mostly the boys), smell her hair to see what scent it is … Organix Coconut Milk, BeeMine Island Mango, or Karen’s Body Beautiful Vanilla Latte!! *lol*

Long review short, if you want to add a book for curly kids that speaks to the uniqueness of their curls, then order Margret’s Mane by April Hogue at http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/adh_books.

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Awwwwww!! Michelle, how you gonna let Chloe think I sent that?? Now I have to really send her something;)!!
Would/Have you purchased a book like this for your little naturalista? What has your child’s experience been like with her/his natural hair? Has it been positive or negative? How do/would you address hair and esteem with your little one?

May-June GOC Update: Michelle (#13) & Chloe (#13.5)

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Ok, so May and the beginning of June have been super busy for me and the fam! My oldest son graduated from UMD (go Terps!) in May and my middle son graduated from high school, my niece had a beautiful baby girl a month early, I wrapped my Spring semester of classes with a 3.5 GPA and Chloe wrapped up her first year as a Brownie with the Girl Scouts at an event with over 200K Girl Scouts on the Mall in Washington, DC … whew, I’m tired!

Hair Onto hair deets. With the super warm weather season peaking earlier in the DMV area, I’ve been rocking my WnGs more and more. I tried two different products for this season’s debut of my WnGs, Hair Rules Curly Whip (Target-$17.99) and Let’s Jam Curling Custard (Walgreens $3.89) that Mahoghany Curls did a few vids on. I liked both, but the Let’s Jam CC was really the best on my hair and the price, YOU CAN’T BEAT the price. Plus, I got 2-3 day hair out of it and then I banana clipped it up for the rest of the work week!


I applied both in the shower on soaking wet hair, squeezed out the excess water with a white tee and air dried. I’ve been pineappling at night and it does help to stretch my WnG.

I also did a few rollersets after watching one of my faves, ShamIAmGlam’s posts (Don’t Call it a Comeback) inspired me to try the style she was wearing for my son’s graduation. I hope I did it some justice Sham!!!

Chloe’s hair for May and June has been a hodge podge of braids, WnG for her middle brother’s graduation, a twist-out for her oldest brother’s graduation (he had two!!!) and just recently rope-twists with rubber bands.


I have not been pre-pooing Chloe like I normally do … her schedule has been cray! I have not done a henna treatment since March!!! But we’re back to our regularly scheduled program, I just re-upped on my henna stash and got in on Henna Sooq’s Friday deals (this one was $5 off any price order) and then I won a $10 credit for a future order!!! Khadija (Henna Sooq partner) is really sweet and responsive; she has a blog that is very informative (maybe we can get her for the next DMV meet-up *hint-hint*). And, Chloe and I are getting a haircut for MY birthday in July! More deets in my July update – can’t wait to debut those pics!! Health & Fitness Ummmmmmm, health and fitness … I’m still breathing and eating … lol! But, I just joined Black Girls Run in my area and I went and was fitted for some running shoes that will offer me some support (low to no arch – I love my flip flops – #dontjudgeme and #lovemyhavianas) and will help with my shin splints. So, keep hope alive that I’ll report increased physical activity for moi! Oh, and Chloe may be resuming her All-Star Cheering again (we missed try-outs in May, I did say we were busy as ISH, right?!). ChloChlo is a bean pole with hair, but we all need to get up and move, right? Until next month, continued success to everyone!

Chloe with her Michael Jackson hat,
for the Anniversary of his death.

Check out Michelle and Chloe’s other GOC-The Sequel posts here:

Initial Submission
April Update

Mini-Hairscapader: Kynnede’s HairStory

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as told by Adrienne (sister) of NaturalEmbrace

What’s your child’s name and age? Tell us a little about her.
Well first let me say that Kynnede is my sister and she’s 14 years younger than me. So, sometimes it does feel like she’s my kid. She’s 11 and just now beginning to pay attention to things like her hair, but still doesn’t take care of it as well as she should. I’ve been trying to tell her about the importance of deep conditioning and sleeping with a satin scarf, but … she’s young and doesn’t listen. Plus, she lives in San Diego with our Dad (I’m in Maryland) and he knows nothing about hair. So, she’s pretty much on her own out there. When she comes to visit, we do as many girly/beauty things as possible. But it’s hard to get her to retain anything I teach her because I don’t see her very often.

How do you care for her/his hair? What products do you use, how often do you wash/condition, what techniques do you use (i.e., how do you detangle), etc.?
When Kynnede visits, I usually take her to get a trim, because her ends are always looking frayed beyond repair. She loves long hair, but I tend to convince her to keep it short until she can better learn to take care of it.

While with me, I make sure she conditions more than she uses shampoo and I always supply her with sulfate free shampoos. But, I don’t even bother with trying to give her silicone free conditioners. She doesn’t deep condition either … so it’s just conditioner in the shower and then she detangles her hair while wet with conditioner, which is about the only thing that has stuck with her after all I’ve told her. She never combs through her hair while dry, but does have a tendency to slick it back with a brush. She usually co-washes every other day, mainly because she’s a wild sleeper without a satin scarf and wakes up with tangled hair … especially if I don’t fit it into a bun or braid the night before.

Do the same products that work for you work for your sister’s hair?
Her hair texture is completely different from mine. It’s a lot looser and more in the 3 family instead of the 4. She can have awesome Botticelli curls when we really work at it. Her hair doesn’t really resist too much and I’m not sure what products she uses regularly when home. But, with me, she uses Tresemmé Naturals to co-wash and I use the Cantu-Shea Butter Leave-in before styling her hair. I sometimes use Eco Styler Gel, depending on the style. Her hair loves the Cantu though, so I made sure she went home with a big bottle! We also did a mini henna treatment, because she wanted red highlights … we didn’t leave it on long enough to make a difference, but it did enhance the natural light brown highlights already in her hair.

What is a typical style? Does she employ protective styles? If so, how often?
 Kynnede hasn’t quite embraced her curls … at least she loves her curly hair, but doesn’t like how her hair looks. I styled her hair in braids for a braid out and it came out awesome! But, she didn’t like it and quickly pulled her hair up into a ponytail, which is her main styling choice. I’m trying to get her to not tie her hair so tightly, but she doesn’t listen … and she keeps using the elastics with the metal on them (despite the fact that I throw them away every time I see them). If she doesn’t have a ponytail, it’s in a bun. Her hair grows quickly and has been waist length before, but she just doesn’t care for her curls well enough at the moment, so her hair isn’t as great as it could be.


What challenges do you face with your sister and her hair?
Mostly, she’s stubborn and wants to do whatever is easiest style-wise and whatever won’t make her look weird. It would be easier for me to teach her about her hair and to care for her curls if we lived in the same state, but we don’t. So, I do what I can while we are together. I’m hoping it’ll get easier when she gets older … she’ll listen eventually!

Has your sister ever had relaxed/texlaxed hair? Why or why not?
Her hair has never been relaxed. Our mother wouldn’t hear of it and none of us wanted to relax her hair anyway … the thought never came up!

Anything else that you’d like to add?
Nothing, just that my sister is pretty awesome for an 11 year old! Very mature for her age and I love hanging out with her!

Mini-Hairscapader: Christopher’s HairStory

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as told by Michelle (mother) of Radiant Brown Beauty

What’s your child’s name and age? Tell us about him.
Christopher, warmly known as CJ to many, is my 11 year little boy diagnosed with cerebral palsy and epilepsy. You probably know that, but what you may not know is he has a head full of curly, curly hair! His hair is even curlier than mine. I have to push and scrunch and rake to get my hair to curl up, because it’s kind of fine and more wavy (except the stubborn crown of course). CJ’s hair is just a massive ball of curls. So much so that our cat mistook his head for a scratching post once. LOL.

How do you care for her/his hair? What products do you use, how often do you wash/condition, what techniques do you use (i.e., how do you detangle), etc.?
Caring for CJ’s hair is easy peasy. Since it’s short, it never gets tangled. I wash his hair with the same products I use to wash my own hair, either Shea Moisture Coco-Hibiscus or Design Essentials shampoo. I don’t condition his hair. I just add a curl enhancer with conditioning properties and some oil to it. Then, I let it air dry.

What challenges do you face with your child’s hair?
He’s a bit sensitive to getting his hair combed (even when it’s detangled), so I figured if I could get it long enough to be braided, then it would cut down on the time of combing his hair daily. Plus, his dad frequently forgets to comb it when getting him ready in the morning for school!

What is a typical style? Do you employ protective styles? If so, how often?
Well, since he’s a boy, I don’t think he really needs protective styling. It’s not like he knows or cares anything about maintaining length :-). In fact, he’d probably be happy with no hair! He doesn’t much care about it. I’m the one whose all into it!

Do you have plans to cut your son’s hair at some point or particular age? Please explain why or why not.
I usually take CJ to the barber once every 2-3 months or so, because he doesn’t keep still. In the between time, I use a curl enhancer on his hair like what Jane Carter Solutions offers. I mainly use that one because it doesn’t do much for my own hair, so I use it on his. It enhances his curls pretty nicely.

I’ve actually decided to grow CJ’s hair! So now when we go to the barber, they only edge him up and trim it a little. I want to grow his hair out so I can braid it. When my oldest son Michael was a teen (similar hair texture), he would let his hair grow and then get it cornrowed. I loved how it looked and figured I’d try the same for CJ.

 

Anything else you’d like to add?
If you had to classify CJ’s hair type, I’d say it’s a mix of 3a and 3b. It grows very very fast (got me a little jealous) and I have often wondered how I would manage it longer. Braids it is.

 

Mini-Hairscapader: Ashanti’s HairStory

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as told by Niah (mother)

What’s your child’s name and age? Tell us a little about her/him.
My daughter’s name is Ashanti and she is 9 years old. She is my beautiful, brilliant and bright baby girl. She is into a little bit of everything: Girl Scouts, gymnastics, different styles of dance, acting and currently in the engineering club at her school, as well as the Vice President of SGA. Ashanti is a lover of anything music and/or fashion related and has been a little princess since day one. No, seriously. She has been crossing her legs (which I later corrected her to cross her ankles) since before she was a year old. She is a very loving and humble little girl who loves her mom. We have a super tight bond. I have been truly blessed with an amazing little girl and I only pray she stays this way forever.  *lol*

How do you care for her hair? What products do you use, how often do you wash/condition, what techniques do you use (i.e., how do you detangle), etc.?
It took me a really long time to figure out the best way to care for her hair, since my texture is very different.  When she was younger, her texture was more like her father’s, which is type 2 and 3. Most people thought her texture type was the easiest, but not nearly. Because, as she got older, her hair changed and is now a mixture of my 4a/4b hair and her father’s type 2 and 3 hair.  So, the crown of her hair, it’s more of my texture, which makes it a little more difficult to detangle. Well, thank GOD for the natural community! When I BC’d the first time about 5 years ago, when she was at the age of 4, I started my research.

I co-wash her hair weekly and wash with shampoo and deep condition every 2 weeks. I finger detangle her hair while washing/co-washing. I always use a leave-in conditioner, Giovanni, after washing. I section her hair into 6 sections and use plenty of leave-in with coconut oil. Comb each section with a wide tooth comb from the ends and work my way to the roots. After detangling, I use my own whipped shea butter mixture (organic shea butter, EVOO and EVCO) to seal her ends and then braid the sections. I use medium size braids. This is an extremely long process, because she has so much hair, but its worth it because she rarely has split ends. Her hair is wrapped in a satin scarf every night.

The products I use on her hair include:

  • Aussie Shampoo and Conditioner
  • Giovanni Leave-in Conditioner
  • Shea butter, EVOO, EVCO
  • Carol’s Daughter Hair Milk
  • Mizani H2O Conditioning Hair Dress

I’ve tried KCCC, but because her hair is so thick, it took almost a week for it to completely dry. It only defined her curls around the perimeter of her head. But the crown, no such luck. In the winter season, I take that time to get her hair blown straight with low heat. This is when we catch up on trimming her ends, if necessary.  Also, when we wash her hair, it takes a few days to dry, since we rarely allow her to wear it out. If we do, she will for sure be able to score a part in the next Diana Ross or Chaka Khan feature. Speaking of which, because she happens to have pretty big hair and loves music, she was asked to play the lead “lady” in a music video acting as Sy Smith.

Do the same products that work for you work for your child’s hair?
For the most part, we are able to use the same products. The only products I do not use on my hair that seem to work well for her are Mizani Rose H2O Conditioning Hair Dress and Carol’s Daughter Hair Milk.

What is a typical style? Do you employ protective styles? If so, how often?
Her hairstyles are seasonal. Lol! Because she is extremely busy during summer break with gymnastics, swimming, dance class, acting class and just play dates and sleepovers, I do a protective style of double strand twists that are refreshed every 2 weeks. It takes about 3 to 4 hours each time, but it’s worth it and she loves it, because it’s the closest she ever gets to wearing her hair down. During the winter time, we have it blown straight and allow her to wear it all out and be free. Anytime around this season, it’s usually her famous ballerina bun or a few ponytails. Either style, whether protected or not, she always wears a satin scarf to bed.

What challenges do you face with your child’s hair?
The only challenge I have with my daughter’s hair is being able to keep it curly after a wash and knowing when it dries, it won’t blow up and create its own time zone. I love it when it gets big, but it loses its curl definition causing it to look like someone threw her away.

Have you ever relaxed/texlaxed your daughter’s hair? Why or why not and, if you relaxed her hair, what prompted the decision to return to natural?
Sadly, I was convinced by a member of her father’s family that I should put a soft texlaxer in hair when she was younger to calm the curls. I thought it was a bad idea as soon as I put it on, so I took it out almost immediately.  Even still, I felt horrible about it and since then, no one can ever tell me what to do to her hair or touch it without my permission. I decided to make sure it remained natural, because her hair was fine the way it was. I just had to learn it and have patience.

How does your child feel about her/his natural hair?
Ashanti loves her natural hair. She loves how versatile it is; how she can wear it big and curly or bone straight, knowing it will be curly again once it’s wet. She definitely appreciates the hours of work I put in her hair and I love to see her face light up when she looks in the mirror after we’re all done.

Anything else that you’d like to add?
Continue to educate yourself and your child on natural hair. Teach them how to love and take care of their hair early, so that they can have that much more appreciation for it. Other than that, if anyone has any great tips on how to maintain curls with hair textures 3/4a, please feel free to share them with me, pleeaaasseee!!! As she gets older, she is over wearing pony tails to school and I don’t want to always straighten her hair. Lastly, along with other great natural hair communities, thank you Shelli for giving us a great tool to get great tips, motivation and inspiration in growing out healthy natural hair.

Mini-Hairscapader: Kennedy’s HairStory

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Now you know that I love the mini-hairscapader hairstories. But this one is particulary near and dear to my heart!!

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as told by Yutonya (mother)

What’s your child’s name and age? Tell us a little about her.
Kennedy is six years old and loves, loves, loves singing. She sings in the morning, afternoon and evening. She hums in the car and has started asking for singing lessons. She loves her curly hair, but every once in a while wants to see what it would look like straightened, which it has never been. I attempted to straighten it one time with an In-Styler type tool and, ¼ way through, decided that I didn’t want to straighten it. I washed her hair and put it in a bun. I would like to say it was out of some purist ideal, but, truthfully, I think I looked at how much hair she had and saw the hours of pulling hair through that flat-iron and opted out.

How do you care for her/his hair? What products do you use, how often do you wash/condition, what techniques do you use (i.e., how do you detangle), etc.?
I co-wash her hair about once a week. I usually do this whenever we change hair styles. I shampoo about once a month. I detangle using my fingers and sometimes lightly brush the ends while there is conditioner in it if the ends get tangled. However, because she wears mostly protective styles, I find that I usually don’t have to detangle too much or use the brush. I have recently begun using olive oil overnight as a pre-poo treatment, only because she can now stand having her hair wrapped for the entire night. I use all Carol’s Daughter products on her hair. We have just started using the Monoi sulfate-free shampoo and Hair Mask from CD. Daily, we use the lite Hair Milk and the Hair Balm. The Hair Balm is a little thicker than the Hair Elixir, which is a very light liquid oil. Although heavier, we switched to the Hair Balm because the Elixir has a strong spearmint/woodsy smell and she would get so many comments in class that she smelled like tree or grass (in a good way) that I decided to switch. The two are very comparable with the same base ingredient of sweet almond oil. Lisa’s Elixir is definitely fragrant as are most of the CD products.

Do the same products that work for you work for your child’s hair?
Actually no. I have sisterlocks, which means I utilize very little products. But the question is interesting because, for the last year, my daughter has been asking me to take out the locks because she wants to see my hair. She can not recall what my hair looked like before the locks. I tell her that it basically looked the same. However, I wanted to go back to my natural hair as well. So, for the past two months I have actually been growing out my sisterlocks. As my locks are considered microlocks, I have just been growing them out and using braid outs to disguise the transition from the sisterlocks to natural. So far so good. Maybe for the next GOC I will post my pictures showing me growing out the sisterlocks. It is an interesting process.

But, back to the question, no we do not use the same products, but maybe soon. I primarily use Carol’s Daughter on Kennedy’s hair. I have managed to control my PJism and found that Carols’ Daughter’s products, although a bit costly, have all of the ingredients that I could possibly combine, mix, create or buy on my own or find in other products. I just find it easier to order online and try different products within that line. I save my adventurist side for trying new styles on her hair vs. trying new hair products. Her hair seems to respond well to CD products, so I stick with them, even when my bank account cries foul. Now, once I grow out my sisterlocks, my PJism will probably return full force, because I will personally want to try out every product under the sun on my newly free hair.

What is a typical style? Do you employ protective styles? If so, how often?
I predominantly employ protective styles. Kennedy basically only wears her hair fully out on special occasions, birthdays, etc. For school, protective styles last longer and withstand the rigor of elementary school. The two styles I always fall back on are the bun and my favorite, the single flat twist with bun. Once the bun is in place I always put a decorative bow or clip to match her outfit and also ensure that it doesn’t look so adult.

Kennedy loves wearing hair clips like her Aunt Shelli. Yes, Aunt Shelli of Hairscapades. Aunt Shelli’s October post on silk bonnets convinced her that it was okay to sleep with her pink silk bonnet to protect her head, and she does not complain when we put it on before bed. And she still asks for the two strand twists that Aunt Shelli put in her head during their sleepover. I think she has found her hair idol.

What challenges do you face with your child’s hair?
None really, because I truly like trying new hairstyles and accessories. She definitely also enjoys new hairstyles as well and has requested the Princess Leia on occasion or other hairstyles specifically. I would say the biggest issue is the distraction that the highly fragrant CD products caused her class. It was probably the combination of the hair products and the body products as we use those as well. LOL!

Have you ever relaxed/texlaxed your daughter’s hair? Why or why not and, if you relaxed her hair, what prompted the decision to return to natural?
I have never relaxed my daughter’s hair and express to her daily that she should appreciate and love the fact that she has beautiful curls. I also instill the same self-love in my son who says he loves his curls. I hope this will be enough to ensure that she does not relax her hair, but if she does, I can relate. Hair does not define all of who we are or will be and I myself have tried every hairstyle in the world from relaxed hair many years ago, braids, natural and now sisterlocks. And for the next GOC, I will go back to natural. Sometimes curiosity does not mean a lack of self-love, it is simply that, curiosity. I know many natural women who went natural simply out of curiosity and nothing more. I hear many also say they did it just because they didn’t want to go to the salon. All reasons are valid, real and worthy. So, would I prefer that she never relax her hair? Absolutely. But, if she does, I can totally understand it. I have scratched the curiosity itch many times and always came back to natural.

Anything else that you’d like to add?
We love Aunt Shelli and Uncle Weusi!

♥♥♥

So, Yoots (as I call her) is my BFF of 21 years! We met our very first day on campus at Princeton in the laundry room. It seems like it was just yesterday. Anywho, this is my sister from another sister y’all ;)! So, you know a slide show to show off my gorgeous babies is up next!!

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